Conquering childhood obesity will take legislative action, conference told

CBC News

Great article by CBC, following the Promoting Healthy Weights in Children Conference in Moncton this week. The article includes quotes by Yoni Freedhoff and Sarah Kirk, and support for legislation to restrict unhealthy food and beverage marketing to kids.

Excerpts:
“The issue, in part, is because of the world we are now living in, where junk food is constant and pervasive and almost impossible to avoid,” – Dr. Yoni Freedhoff, Assistant Professor of Family Medicine at the University of Ottawa.
“A food culture that’s made junk food the norm for many children has to change. But getting junk food out of the childhood diet will require legislative change, just as cutting tobacco use did,” says Dr. Yoni Freehoff.
Sample Tweet:
Retweet Heart & Stroke and tag @YoniFreedhoff 

Liberals insist junk food ad bill won’t hurt sports sponsorships

iPolitics

 The Liberal government plans to amend a Senate public bill that would ban advertising junk food to children under the age of 17. … Industry had also raised concerns that the original wording of the bill could have hurt sports sponsorships in Canada, but that was stripped out before it cleared the Senate. Read full article

Nutrition Experts Optimistic About New Canada Food Guide to Be Released This Spring

The Epoch Times

“A food policy issue both experts agree on is the new legislation banning the advertising of unhealthy foods to children. The Child Health Protection Act is now in its second reading in the House of Commons and is set to be passed this year”. Read article…

 

 

Front-of-package symbols proposed for foods high in sodium, sugar, saturated fat

Waterloo Chronicle

The federal government wants to make it easier for consumers to choose healthy foods with front-of-package warnings on items that contain high levels of sodium, sugar or saturated fat — ingredients linked to chronic health problems like obesity, heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes.

Petitpas Taylor was accompanied at the news conference by representatives of health advocacy groups such as Diabetes Canada, Dieticians of Canada and the Canadian Public Health Association, as well as the Retail Council of Canada. They lauded the proposed warning labels. Read the full article here.

 

 

THOMPSON: Canadians should take note of the Chilean war on obesity

InfoTel News

Should Canada take up arms against obesity like Chile? THOMPSON: Canadians should take note of the Chilean war on obesity. OPINION: Tony the Tiger – you know, that blue-nosed cat that hawked Frosted Flakes for Kellogg’s for 66 years – was killed in Santiago. Read full OpEd…

Commercials are selling teens on junk food — to the tune of 520 extra snacks a year 

Metro News

Have you ever been watching a commercial and suddenly felt the urge to stuff your face with pop tarts or potato chips? Of course you have. Ads work on all of us, including kids — that’s why companies spend so much money on them, said Dr. Tom Warshawski, UBC pediatrics professor and chair of the board of the Child Obesity Foundation.

A new UK study shows young people tend to consume more junk food when it’s advertised to them on TV. In Canada, Bill-S228 would restrict unhealthy food #Marketing2Kids with no impact on Kids’ community-level sports sponsorships. Read full article

 

Grocery stores and Canadians are bulking up on ultra-processed foods

The Star

This op-ed by Jean-Claude Moubarac (@jc_moubarac) discusses ultra-processed food consumption and includes mention of Canada’s Health Eating Strategy including Marketing to Kids legislation as solutions. Read full OpEd

 

The Maple Syrup Miracle and other Canadian science breakthroughs that happened in 2017

Can Tech Letter

Science certainly had its share of newsworthy items in 2017, from the solar eclipse to the first gene editing of a human embryo, to the discovery of Earth-like planets around a nearby star to the expanding powers of artificial intelligence and the success of the first artificial womb.

Another topic in the public eye would be obesity, overweight and nutrition, with Health Canada currently in the midst of a major overhaul of its nutrition guidelines and food product regulations. On that issue, Canadian researchers had a lot to say, as well. To point to just a couple of studies, UNB scientists found that banning junk food at public schools actually leads to fewer overweight and obese children, while the Heart & Stroke Foundation determined that our kids are exposed to a shocking 25 million junk food ads a year. Read full article here.

Doritos, are you telling my daughter to shut up?

Today’s Parent | Blog: Ceri Marsh

The cheesy chip company is developing a “women-friendly chip” that’s quieter and tidier. Let’s not mistake it for anything other than fast food trying to profit on the societally-imposed insecurities of girls and women. Read full blog in Today’s Parent

Trevor Hancock: Hoping for progress on health-related issues

Times Columnist

Well, world peace, of course. And to be rid of The Donald. But while with any luck the latter is possible, and the former is devoutly to be wished for, I would settle for some healthy actions closer to home. Here are a few of the major population and public health issues where I hope we might see some progress in 2018.

… On the topic of making the next generation less healthy, a 2014 Statistics Canada report noted: “Obesity has become one of the world’s greatest health concerns and threatens to undo gains made in life expectancy during the 20th century”…. [T]here is a proposal for new regulations for front-of-pack warning labels for packaged foods high in salt, saturated fat and sugar that would be much easier for consumers to understand. Third, there is a strong push for Canada to prohibit the marketing of unhealthy food and beverages to children. You can help by supporting the Stop Marketing to Kids Coalition and writing to your MP. Go to stopmarketingtokids.ca for more information.