Big Food versus Canada’s Food Guide

CFJC Today

“The interests of the food industry don’t always coincide with healthy eating. What’s at stake is Canada’s new food guide”. Read article here… 

Junk food ads to be banned in all London tube stations from next year, says Sadiq Khan

Independent News
A great display of leadership by London’s Mayor, Sadiq Khan. On Friday, the city announced that as of February 2019, the city of London (England) will ban junk food advertising across all public transportation network. 

  • “It’s clear that advertising plays a huge part in the choices we make, whether we realise it or not, and Londoners have shown overwhelming support for a ban on adverts for junk food and drink on our transport network.” Mayor Sadiq Khan

Sample Tweet: Retweet Dr. Alexey Kulikov (links to article from The Gaurdian) | Retweet World Cancer Research Fund UK

Health Canada changes how rules for marketing food to kids will be applied

iPolitics

“Health Canada says it’s tweaking how new rules will be applied that restrict how food is marketed to kids, in response to the food industry’s fear that, under new legislation, foods like bread, yogurt and cheese would be labelled “unhealthy”. Read article here... 

How the Food Industry Uses Big Tobacco Tactics to Manipulate the Public

Eater

Leaked documents have revealed companies like Coca-Cola suppress science to shape public opinion. Read here... 

Child rights: the right approach for governments to protect children from harmful marketing

Summary of a UN General Assembly High-level Meeting on NCDs on 27 September 2018, where governments agreed to address non-communicable diseases (NCD) with “robust laws and fiscal measures.” The UN meeting concluded with a Political Declaration that took a right-base approach to childhood obesity and NCD prevention.  Read here… 

Sample Tweet: Retweet NCD Child

More than music: Raffi brings his dedication to children to Sacramento

Sacramento Bee

  • Raffi featured in The Sacramento Bee discussing respecting young children and not exploiting their inability to understand marketing tactics

  • In recent years, Raffi has turned down “a movie deal, TV shows and commercial endorsements after learning they would be directly marketed at children”

  • Read full article here

Sample Tweet: .@Raffi_RC “[children are] not old enough to understand what they’re being pitched,” he said. “If you respect young children — if you respect anyone — you don’t exploit them”. Stop #Marketing2Kids #BillS228

Your Kid’s Apps Are Crammed With Ads

New York Times 

  • A new study by Dr. Jenny Radesky, assistant professor of developmental behavioral pediatrics at the University of Michigan Medical School, found advertising present in almost all of the most downloaded apps for children ages five and younger, many of which appear to violate the F.T.C. rules regarding unfair and deceptive advertising.
  • “In apps marketed for children 5 and under in the Google Play store, there were pop-up ads with disturbing imagery. There were ads that no child could reasonably be expected to close out of, and which, when triggered, would send a player into more ads. Dancing treasure chests would give young players points for watching video ads, potentially endlessly. The vast majority of ads were not marked at all. Characters in children’s games gently pressured the kids to make purchases, a practice known as host-selling, banned in children’s TV programs in 1974 by the Federal Trade Commission. At other times an onscreen character would cry if the child did not buy something.”
  • “To accompany the publication of the study, called “Advertising in Young Children’s Apps: A Content Analysis”, more than a dozen media and children’s health advocacy organizations sent the F.T.C. a letter asking for an investigation.” They argue that the advertising tactics described in the study “violate Section 5 of the Federal Trade Commission Act, which bans unfair and deceptive business practices.”
  • “The tide has turned… You can feel it. A few years ago to suggest limiting tech for kids would have sounded alarmist, and now that’s changing. It’s unfair to children and deceptive the way the ads are structured into the play” – Dr. Montgomery, a professor of Communications at American University)
  • “The hardest argument to make when you live in the U.S. is that children’s rights should be higher than the rights of advertisers”
  • Many of the apps looked at in the study were free apps.
  • The authors argue that the “bombardment of advertising undercuts most of the educational content an app may include.”
  • Dr. Jenny Radesky, the study’s author, “hopes the study will lead parents to ask more questions about the games their kids are playing. And she hopes it leads to regulation, though she suspects that will be a harder battle.”

Read full New York Times article here: Your Kid’s Apps Are Crammed With Ads

Time Spent by children online linked to requests for junk food

Medicalxpress

United Kingdom researchers conducted a study that found that young children who spend more than half an hour a day online were almost twice as likely to pester their parents for junk food. The study, published on October 17, 2018, also found that “primary school children who spent more than three hours on the web were more than four times more likely to spend their pocket money on chocolate, crisps, sugary drinks”.

Read more…

 

City and schools can lead the charge against junk food

Ottawa Citizen

Expert:
…And while a great deal has changed over the course of the past 50 years, one of the most dramatic changes has been to food culture. There doesn’t seem to be an occasion too small to not warrant the use of junk food to reward, pacify or entertain, and is there a cause nowadays that isn’t encouraging an already overindulgent nation to purchase more junk food to fund children’s hospitals, schools, sports teams, kids’ clubs and more? 
 
Though changing social norms is not likely to be quick or easy, leadership needs to come from beyond the grassroots if we’re going to see new healthy norms grow. Cities are in a unique position to play an important role.
 
Because it’s not enough to simply tell people to make healthier choices. Though I’ve seen signs stationed beside my local sporting arena’s vending machines encouraging potential customers to make low- or no-calorie choices, will a well-intentioned sign outweigh the fact that at the Walter Baker Centre (for instance), there are nine vending machines, 37 quarter candy slots, and a canteen that offers almost exclusively no-name fast food options? If education alone were sufficient to permanently change behaviour, we wouldn’t be in the mess we’re in.
Read full article: ARMCHAIR MAYOR: City and schools can lead the charge against junk food 
 
Retweet Heart & Stroke: Some good food for thought from @YoniFreedhoff: cities are in a unique position to improve our food environment by removing the sale of junk food at city-run facilities including arenas, libraries and schools #Marketing2Kids

ARMCHAIR MAYOR: City and schools can lead the charge against junk food

Ottawa Citizen

A great OpEd by Dr. Yoni Freedoff, highlighting the important role that cities and schools have in improving our food landscape and health trajectories.

Expert:

“…And while a great deal has changed over the course of the past 50 years, one of the most dramatic changes has been to food culture. There doesn’t seem to be an occasion too small to not warrant the use of junk food to reward, pacify or entertain, and is there a cause nowadays that isn’t encouraging an already overindulgent nation to purchase more junk food to fund children’s hospitals, schools, sports teams, kids’ clubs and more?

Though changing social norms is not likely to be quick or easy, leadership needs to come from beyond the grassroots if we’re going to see new healthy norms grow. Cities are in a unique position to play an important role.

Because it’s not enough to simply tell people to make healthier choices. Though I’ve seen signs stationed beside my local sporting arena’s vending machines encouraging potential customers to make low- or no-calorie choices, will a well-intentioned sign outweigh the fact that at the Walter Baker Centre (for instance), there are nine vending machines, 37 quarter candy slots, and a canteen that offers almost exclusively no-name fast food options? If education alone were sufficient to permanently change behaviour, we wouldn’t be in the mess we’re in.”

Retweet Heart & Stroke: Some good food for thought from @YoniFreedhoff: cities are in a unique position to improve our food environment by removing the sale of junk food at city-run facilities including arenas, libraries and schools #Marketing2Kids