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Advocates want federal government to adopt national school food program

CBC News

With Parliament set to open Dec. 5, a group of advocates is hoping the federal government will support a national school food program based on the new Canada Food Guide. Canada is the only G7 nation without such a program.There was some political interest from federal parties throughout the last election, the Liberals had a national food program in their spring budget before the election, and the Green and New Democratic parties also had it in their platforms.  Read the article here.

Children consume products with added sugar too early and too often, a new study finds

CTV News

Researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the United States found added sugars in the daily diets of 61 per cent of babies (aged six to eleven months) and 98 per cent of toddlers (aged 12 to 23 months), according to a new study published by the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Read the article here

More than music: Raffi brings his dedication to children to Sacramento

Sacramento Bee

  • Raffi featured in The Sacramento Bee discussing respecting young children and not exploiting their inability to understand marketing tactics

  • In recent years, Raffi has turned down “a movie deal, TV shows and commercial endorsements after learning they would be directly marketed at children”

  • Read full article here

Sample Tweet: .@Raffi_RC “[children are] not old enough to understand what they’re being pitched,” he said. “If you respect young children — if you respect anyone — you don’t exploit them”. Stop #Marketing2Kids #BillS228

What would you do with an extra 5-10 hours a week?

Join us and turn off your screens for Screen-Free Week April 30 – May 6

The Stop Marketing to Kids Coalition is proud to endorse 2018 Screen-Free Week—a coordinated effort to encourage millions around the world to turn off televisions, smartphones, tablets, and gaming consoles for seven days and connect more deeply with the world around them. Screen-Free Week is a chance for children to read, play, think, create, be more physically active and to spend more time with friends and family.

On average, preschool children spend over four and a half hours a day consuming screen media, while older children spend over seven hours a day. Excessive screen time is linked to a number of problems for children, including childhood obesity, poor school performance and problems with attention span.

While reducing screen time can help limit children’s exposure to slick ads for unhealthy food and beverages—it is not enough. Canadian children see over 25 million food and beverage ads a year on their favourite websites. Robust federal restrictions are essential to protect all children from the health impacts of pervasive unhealthy food and beverage marketing where they live, learn and play.

The Stop Marketing to Kids Coalition endorses Screen-Free Week as a great initiative that challenges us to dedicate time to activities beyond our screens, that enrich health and wellbeing—through relationships, literacy, learning and play.

Join us April 30 – May 6 for Screen-Free Week! Visit screenfree.org to learn more.

By Ashley Hughes, Registered Dietitian and Coordinator for the Stop Marketing to Kids Coalition 

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Screen-Free Week is coordinated by the Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood, a national advocacy organization devoted to reducing the impact of commercialism on children. Since Screen-Free Week’s founding in 1994, it has been celebrated by millions of children and their families worldwide. For more information, visit www.screenfree.org