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Argentina’s Congress passes food labelling law

Buenos Aires Times 

Argentina’s Congress approved a new law obliging the food industry to include packaging labels alerting the consumer as to excessive sugar, fat and sodium content. The labels must read “excessive sugar,” “excessive sodium,” “excessive saturated fat,” “excessive total fat” and “excessive calories,” as well as alerting whether caffeine or sweeteners are contained, two components not recommended for child consumption.The food industry will be given 180 days to adapt to the new rules. Read more

Red for stop, green for go: Study measures effectiveness of colour-coded front-of-pack labels on consumer behaviour

Food Navigator 

A recent study has come out in favour of mandatory front-of-pack labelling (FOPL) policies – for both directing consumer choice and encouraging the food industry to reformulate products. The study published in PLOS Medicine confirmed the benefit of colour-coded labels in nudging consumers to choose more healthy products.  Read more

 

A quick, cost-free way for the federal government to save lives

Doug Roth, CEO of the Heart and Stroke Foundation penned an op-ed that appeared in several papers across Canada. “The packaged food industry has been thriving during the pandemic as we eat more comfort foods, snacks and find pleasure in the little things. Unfortunately, identifying healthy choices and comparing products in the grocery store is not an easy, straightforward task. We need simple nutritional information on the front of packaged foods. It’s one very important way we can help prevent the illness and deaths that come from unhealthy food choices.” Read more

Viewpoint: Nutrient warnings on Unhealthy Foods

JAMA Network 
Unhealthy diets, characterized by overconsumption of ultra-processed foods and sugary drinks, increase the risk of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and heart disease. A nutrient warning policy is a common-sense response to rising rates of diet-related disease. Nutrient warnings could help inform consumers, encourage the food industry to make healthier products, benefit public health, counteract certain industry marketing practices, and potentially improve health equity. Read the article

Sugar tax, prominent labels reduce sugar consumption, Ontario study suggests

Toronto Star

A University of Waterloo study suggests that taxes on sugary products and labels on the front of packages can help reduce sugar consumption. The study, which included more than 3,500 people aged 13 and over on their purchasing behaviour last spring, also found that taxes could have the greatest impact if 100 percent fruit juice was included in reduction efforts. Read article here.
Read the study here