Posts

Would you support a sugar tax?

CBC Radio Maritime Connection 

Following the news that the province of Newfoundland & Labrador was introducing a sugar levy in April 2022, Stop Marketing to Kids Coalition co-chair Dr. Tom Warshawski was interviewed on CBC Radio’s Maritimes Connection program to discuss the benefits of a sugar levy. Listen here

MPP Gélinas junk food bill would remove tasty treats from cash checkout areas

Toronto Star 

Ontario Nickel Belt New Democrat MPP and official opposition health critic France Gélinas has introduced a bill at Queen’s Park to remove the tempting racks of junk food and other treats with high fat, high sugar and high sodium content that are often located near cash register checkouts. A news release from Gélinas’ office said the bill is called the Temptation Be Gone Act and allows the government to make regulations that restrict the sales and marketing of certain treats — including restrictions on what can be located right next to the cash register. Read more

Is Obesity Policy in England Fit for Purpose? Analysis of Government Strategies and Policies, 1992–2020

The Milbank Quarterly 
A review of thirty years of proposed Government obesity policies in England has found few to be successful or to have led to a consistent reduction in obesity rates. One major finding is that policies largely make high demands on individual agency, meaning they rely on individuals to make behaviour changes rather than shaping external influences and are thus less likely to be effective or equitable. Read the study

Nutrition report card gives Alberta a C grade – again

CBC Edmonton
For the fourth year in a row, Alberta has received a C grade on a report card that evaluates food environments and nutrition policies for young people. The sixth annual report card grades the province’s score across five environments: physical, communication, economic, social and political.  Alberta received A grades in some areas but overall, the report found much room for improvement. The experts gave Alberta an F for failing to reduce household food insecurity and failing to restrict the marketing of unhealthy foods to children. Read the article 

Junk food marketers found targeting children on social media without repercussions

Medical XPress

A new study has found that while most major social media platforms have restrictions on the advertising of tobacco, alcohol and gambling to children, there are hardly any such restrictions in place around junk food. The study’s authors contend that the potential role of social media platforms in regulating junk food marketing has largely escaped attention. Read the article here

You can read the study here

Physicians group calls for legislation to regulate digital advertising and its effect on kids

CNN

To help protect kids from the harmful effects of digital advertising and data collection, the American Academy of Pediatrics is calling on lawmakers to ban all advertising targeted to children under the age of 7. The group is urging limits to advertising aimed at those under 17.  Read the article here

 

 

Over 100 doctors call for tax on junk food to handle obesity epidemic

Metro Newspaper (UK) 

A group of around 200 doctors and healthcare professionals signed an open letter to ministers putting forward a number of proposals to overhaul the UK’s ‘unfair, unhealthy and unsustainable’ food system when the pandemic passes. This includes a tax on foods that are high in salt and fat, a tax on food derived from animal agriculture, subsidies for plant-based diets, a return of public sector catering to stop processed meat being served in schools and hospitals and that the ban on junk food advertising is accelerated and made total, banning such advertising even after the watershed. Read the article here

Sugary Drink Consumption Plunges in Chile After New Food Law

The New York Times

A study found that a law requiring warning labels on unhealthy foods made a swift difference in purchases of sodas, bottled water and juices. Consumption of sugar-sweetened drinks dropped practically 25 per cent in the 18 months after Chile adopted a raft of laws that included promoting restrictions on unhealthy meals, front-of-package warning labels and a ban on junk meals in schools. Read more

Teenagers campaign for ‘traffic light’ labels on food packaging

The Guardian

Bite Back 2030, a campaign group led by teenagers, is calling for traffic light-style front of pack labelling to be made mandatory in the UK. The group said progress on improving child health was stalling. “We want honest, simple and helpful labelling like the traffic light system out there on everything. And if food companies won’t do it voluntarily, we want the government to step up and step in. The UK should be leading by example, not falling behind,” said Bite Back 2030’s youth chair 16-year-old Christina Adane. Read more

The ban on marketing junk food to kids might not happen after all

Today’s Parent

“Parents, we’re powerless against big food companies. But as a collective voice, we can stand together for the rights of our kids and speak up”.

“Bill S-228 has been raised on the Senate floor four times, but the final vote hasn’t happened because it’s been adjourned all four times by request of a senator. That’s because the food industry is putting pressure on senators to stop the bill from becoming law. Parents aren’t supposed to know about this, but thankfully, CBC News shared a confidential letter written by industry groups, asking senators to continue to “withhold your concurrence” on Bill S-228″. Read full OpEd here

Retweet Today’s Parent with comment: #BillS228 has been raised on the #SenCA floor 4 times and adjourned at the behest of industry. Industry is orchestrating Senate to kill the bill. Thank you @Todaysparent and @CBCNews for shining light on this. The time has come. Pass Bill S-228. #cdnpoli