Posts

Sweet spot: Norwegians cut sugar intake to lowest level in 44 years

The Guardian

An annual report on the Norwegian diet reported that average annual consumption of sugar had plummeted from 43kg to 24kg per person between 2000 and 2018 – including a 27% reduction in the past decade – to a level lower than that recorded in 1975.  Norway has had a sugar tax since 1922 and more recently has created separate taxes for confectionary and sugary drinks.

Read the article here.

Children consume products with added sugar too early and too often, a new study finds

CTV News

Researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the United States found added sugars in the daily diets of 61 per cent of babies (aged six to eleven months) and 98 per cent of toddlers (aged 12 to 23 months), according to a new study published by the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Read the article here

How children get hooked on sugary drinks

New York Times

Nearly two-thirds of the $2.2 billion in beverages marketed to children in 2018 contained added sweeteners, according to a report released last week by the Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity at the University of Connecticut. The report found that the packaging and marketing of these products often leave parents confused.   Read the New York Times article here.

 

 

Sugar tax, prominent labels reduce sugar consumption, Ontario study suggests

Toronto Star

A University of Waterloo study suggests that taxes on sugary products and labels on the front of packages can help reduce sugar consumption. The study, which included more than 3,500 people aged 13 and over on their purchasing behaviour last spring, also found that taxes could have the greatest impact if 100 percent fruit juice was included in reduction efforts. Read article here.
Read the study here

How Senate can work across party lines to stop the marketing of junk food to children

The Province

A great article by Dr. Tom Warshawski (Chair, Childhood Obesity Foundation) and Yves Savoie (CEO, Heart and Stroke) highlighting the bipartisan journey of Bill S-228, Senate’s delay and what’s at stake. (originally published in the Hill Times on 16 April 2019).
Excerpt: “The Senate has the choice of either protecting the health of our children by passing Bill S-228 in a timely manner or protecting the interests of the industry food lobby by continuing to delay its passage… The bill is a perfect example of how a non-partisan Senate can use its plentiful resources to study a problem, propose solutions and then introduce strong legislation that supports the government’s mandate. This is the Senate at its best”. Read full OpEd here

Simple way to inoculate teens against junk food advertising

Science Daily

Researchers find diets improve when tapping adolescents’ desire to rebel; teenage boys cut back junk food purchases by 31 percent. Read here

Labeling added sugars content on packaged foods and beverages could lower heart disease/diabetes risk and cut healthcare costs

American Heart Association

A label showing added sugars content on all packaged foods and sugary drinks could have substantial health and cost-saving benefits in the United States over the next 20 years, according to a new study published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation. Read here

Majority of supermarket foods targeted to Canadian kids aren’t healthy, UCalgary research finds

UCalgary News
A new study led by Dr. Charlene Elliott evaluating 374 food products sold in Calgary supermarkets shows the majority of those targeted to kids would not be permitted for marketing to kids under new policies being considered by the federal government. Read uCalgary news here

Read the study here

UNICEF Canada supports call for federal Commissioner for Children and Youth

Canada Newswire

UNICEF Canada references the debate around marketing to children in a recent press release. Read press release here

IT’S TIME TO BRING FOOD MARKETING BILL TO A VOTE IN THE SENATE: SENATOR DEAN

Senate of Canada [reprint]

Great Oped by Senator Dean.

“If Canada’s Senate is to be recognized as a modern and important part of our legislative process, it must work efficiently. This means devoting time to providing constructive improvements to important legislation while passing promptly those bills that have already gone through due process, such as Bill S-228. This is good business planning and our children and our families are counting on it”.

Read full OpEd on Senate of Canada here