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The ban on marketing junk food to kids might not happen after all

Today’s Parent

“Parents, we’re powerless against big food companies. But as a collective voice, we can stand together for the rights of our kids and speak up”.

“Bill S-228 has been raised on the Senate floor four times, but the final vote hasn’t happened because it’s been adjourned all four times by request of a senator. That’s because the food industry is putting pressure on senators to stop the bill from becoming law. Parents aren’t supposed to know about this, but thankfully, CBC News shared a confidential letter written by industry groups, asking senators to continue to “withhold your concurrence” on Bill S-228″. Read full OpEd here

Retweet Today’s Parent with comment: #BillS228 has been raised on the #SenCA floor 4 times and adjourned at the behest of industry. Industry is orchestrating Senate to kill the bill. Thank you @Todaysparent and @CBCNews for shining light on this. The time has come. Pass Bill S-228. #cdnpoli

Eleventh-hour lobbying by industry could kill law banning food marketing to kids

CBC News

“It’s a cliff-hanging, nail-biting ending that nobody saw coming. What’s at stake is a law that would protect children from being targeted with advertising for foods that are high in sugar, fat and salt.

But the legislation (Bill S-228) has been caught in a late-stage drama in the halls of the Canadian Senate, where a powerful coalition of advertisers, food processors, and retailers is in the midst of an eleventh-hour lobby campaign”. Read full article here

Retweet Heart & Stroke: Former Conservative Senator Nancy Greene Raine worked across party lines to develop Bill S-228. Almost 1,000 days later and it still hasn’t passed. Children will be the victims. @SenateCA, it’s time to call the vote! #cndpoli #Marketing2Kids

The Ads That Kids Shouldn’t See

The University of Toronto Magazine

Professor Mary L’Abbé, who conducts research into the nutritional quality of packaged and restaurant food, talks to deputy editor Stacey Gibson about the disturbing consequences of marketing unhealthy fare to kids.
Excerpt: “We want more of the onus to be put on the system rather than the individual to find the healthiest food. A parent goes into a grocery store with two children in tow and, with limited time, tries to pick out the healthiest foods while being bombarded by advertisements. It’s a hard job, and we want to help minimize the struggle”.

UNICEF Canada supports call for federal Commissioner for Children and Youth

Canada Newswire

UNICEF Canada references the debate around marketing to children in a recent press release. Read press release here

Nancy Greene Raine on Olympic memories, staying active and fighting Tony the Tiger

Global News

Excerpts: Re: push-back on restricting Tony the Tiger || “This was a 50-year-old man talking about how important Tony the Tiger was. It just tells me how powerful [advertising] was, that even today, he has an emotional connection to that cartoon character… [t]hey know if they get brand loyalty at an early age they have a customer for life” – former Senator Nancy Greene Raine

Read full article…

Half of food and drink TV ads seen by children are for unhealthy products – study

The Gaurdian

“Half of food and drink advertisements children see on television are for junk food, sugary drinks and outlets such as McDonald’s, prompting fresh calls for tougher action to limit exposure to them.

The research from the Institute for Fiscal Studies comes amid calls for the government to impose much tougher restrictions on the ability of food manufacturers and retailers to advertise junk foods as part of a crackdown on childhood obesity”. 

Read full article…

 

Nutrition Experts Optimistic About New Canada Food Guide to Be Released This Spring

The Epoch Times

“A food policy issue both experts agree on is the new legislation banning the advertising of unhealthy foods to children. The Child Health Protection Act is now in its second reading in the House of Commons and is set to be passed this year”. Read article…

 

 

Stop Marketing to Kids Infographic